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60% of horses suffer with this!

60% of horses suffer with this!

Don’t let yours be one of them. Gastric ulceration is virtually ubiquitous among performance horses, occurring in as many as 93% of Thoroughbred racehorses. In addition, up to 60% of other athletic horses also show signs of the disease. The problem is even of great importance in foals, as up to 57% of foal will show ulceration in their first few months of life. YET up to 50% of horses with ulcers do not show any outward signs of the condition! WHY OH WHY? There are many environmental and physiological factors that contribute to the appearance of gastric ulcers in...

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Winter Sucks!

Winter Sucks!

Let’s be honest – winter really sucks doesn’t it? It doesn’t get light till almost lunchtime and by supper it’s dark again. And while we grope around for a light switch our fingers are practically dropping off from being frozen. And seriously, and who can honestly say they’ve never uttered foul words when struggling to push a wheelbarrow through 3 feet of snow and then all the hay falls out? When it comes to our horses, I’m sure they feel the same. I mean, don’t we bundle them up in multiple heavy blankets complete with hoods, and lock them in...

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LIVER Health Redux!

LIVER Health Redux!

Liver Function in the Horse The horse is one of Nature’s most beautiful and mystifying creations. There’s something about that magnificent organization of power and grace that inspires us to a level of wonder unlike any other animal on the planet. It is quite unlikely, however, that we attribute much of the horse’s enchantment to his liver. After all, there’s something decidedly unmagical about offal. And indeed for the casual un-invested observer, a horse’s liver may not warrant any particular attention. But to those of us enslaved by the incalculable power of the horse, a little knowledge about his liver...

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A Helpful & Healthful Treat!

A Helpful & Healthful Treat!

Want to reward your companion but don’t like the idea of molases, saturated fat, unbalanced omega 3’s and toxic sugars for your horse ? Check out our HERBits treats with only 2 ingredients (soluble fibre nature’s original equine comfort food and a real , natural, benificial flavour: Licorice, Spearmint, Cinnamon, Apple or Carrot). Free Shipping, Affiliate and Rewards Program Ask about our free shipping, Affiliate program and HERBucks points for frequent shoppers!

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Pre and Probiotics: Gut Health

Pre and Probiotics: Gut Health

Probiotics and Prebiotics: understanding their unique roles in gut health We’ve all heard about PRObiotics, but increasingly we are starting to see products claiming to be PREbiotics. How are prebiotics different from probiotics, and do they actually contribute to improved gut health? Probiotics have a well-established role in promoting robust gut health, and work primarily by introducing live cultures of ‘beneficial’ bacteria into the horse’s gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria include bifidobacteria, lactobaccilus, and eubacteria, and are considered beneficial because they do not participate, to a significant degree, in the pathogenesis of disease. These beneficial bacteria play a vital role in...

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Mum…”don’t forget the PRE biotics”!

Probiotics have a well-established role in promoting robust gut health, and work primarily by introducing live cultures of ‘beneficial’ bacteria into the horse’s gastrointestinal tract. These bacteria include bifidobacteria, lactobaccilus, and eubacteria, and are considered beneficial because they do not participate, to a significant degree, in the pathogenesis of disease. These beneficial bacteria play a vital role in breaking down non-digestible fibres for the production of volatile fatty acids, which are subsequently absorbed by the horse for energy. Prebiotics, on the other hand, are not live cultures. Rather, they are compounds that are indigestible by the horse, so arrive relatively...

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Mycotoxins in the equine environment

Mycotoxins are compounds produced by moulds and fungi, and can be found in pastures as well as on dried forages, bedding, grains, and complete feeds. Of all the agricultural species, horses are among the most sensitive to toxicosis from mycotoxins. An important reason for this is that horses typically have a much longer life span than any other agricultural species and exposure to mycotoxins can be over many years. Clinical signs of pathological exposure to mycotoxins may include reduced growth rates in foals/young horses, respiratory dysfunction, problems with fertility and reproduction, neurological and/or brain disorders, liver or kidney damage, allergic...

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on Joint Supplements

I have an older horse †and I’m worried about him developing arthritis. Is there any evidence that joint care supplements can help prevent the development of joint inflammation? Joint care products are among the most popular supplements fed by horse people. Millions of dollars a year are spent on a wide range of mysterious powders, including glucosamine, chondroitin, MSM, DMG, hyaluronic acid, and a multitude of herbal blends. However, consumer enthusiasm for parting with their money on behalf of these products is not necessarily matched by manufacturer willingness to provide research evidence for safety or efficacy. Seeking products with evidence...

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My horse has a big belly but I can still see his ribs. Is he fat?

This sounds like a very typical "hay belly". Hay belly is, literally, a belly full of hay. This is very common, particularly in older horses, and frequently is caused by a declining ability to digest hay usually due to inadequately chewing the hay. Consequently hay sits in the gut for a prolonged period of time and accumulates. Meanwhile, they horse cannot extract sufficient nutrients from the hay so, despite their roly poly belly, they actually become underweight, hence the ribs. Our goal in feeding a horse like this is to optimize digestion of long stem fiber so that we reduce...

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Herbs for Horses takes on highest level of food-safety certification

As part of our commitment to selling safe and honest products, Herbs for Horses recently achieved ISO-22000 certification. “It’s the highest level of global food safety certification” explains Ralph Robinson, owner of Herbs for Horses. The standards – set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) – are designed to ensure that products are safe, reliable, and of good, consistent quality. It’s a voluntary step for the company, but one that fits with Herbs for Horses overall approach to doing business. For Robinson, selling an honest and quality product has always been at the forefront of his company’s mission. I...

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